Wednesday, 17 August 2016

Lemon sour cream cake



This recipe was included in a school recipe book published as a fundraiser at my children's high school in 1994. Some of the best recipes can be found in these compilations of old family favourites. So does this mean it is a vintage recipe? I'll leave you to be the judge.  When I tasted it again last week after many years, at Mahjong at my friend Lou's house, I knew it was a winner and had to bake it. It is a large cake, with a beautiful texture and the lemon and sour cream combine to take the taste sensation to another level. Absolutely delicious. It works best in a bundt tin or just one of those tins which creates a hole in the middle of the cake, so that the lemon juice absorbs more efficiently over the surface of the cake instead of soaking into the middle. However a normal large springform tin would work just as well. It also freezes well if cut into individual slices and individually wrapped. A good cake to make whilst lemons are in season.,




INGREDIENTS:

250g butter
2 1/2 cups castor sugar
1/4 cup self raising flour
2 cups plain flour
3/4 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
6 eggs
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice


Just waiting quietly for some icing and decoration
LET'S COOK:
  1. Cream butter, lemon rind and sugar until light and fluffy. This may take a while.
  2. Beat in eggs one at a time
  3. Stir in sifted dry ingredients alternately with sour cream. Spread mixture into greased deep 23cm round cake tin or well greased bundt tin, and line the base with greased baking paper.
  4. Bake in a moderately slow oven (160 deg C-170 deg C) for 1 1/2 hours to 1 3/4 hours.
  5. Remove from the oven, turn out of tin onto a cake plate, and then pour 1/2 cup of fresh lemon juice over the top. Sprinkle with icing sugar just before serving.
  6. Instead of sifting icing sugar over the top, you could also drizzle lemon icing over the top for more decoration.
  7. Serve with a spoonful of Greek yoghurt on the side.
Dear Reader, Do you still cook some family favourites from old school , CWA and church recipe books? Do you think they can now be called vintage recipes but offer themselves to be revamped for a more 21st century presentation?

Enjoy!

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